I love history. Must have something to do with the history teacher I had at my high school in Oslo. He was also our literature teacher. A survivor from Sachsenhausen during the second world war, he was a humble man, had polio as a kid, tall and gangling, looked like he’d keel over any time as he limped into class, books in hand, always ready, passionate about being a teacher. Formal and correct in every way, calling us all by our last names, fierce about grammar. He was a kind man, I remember him with much fondness.

Thomas E. Ricks – Pulitzer Prize Winner: Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom

At first glance they may seem like an odd couple, but their influence on the seminal events and the thinking of the 20th century is equally profound. Winston Churchill defined and led the resistance against the tyranny of Adolf Hitler, George Orwell understood and explained the nature of totalitarian regimes. They were both men who were prepared to change themselves in order to change the world.

Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas E. Ricks has written an insightful account of these two men whose paths never crossed and came from opposite ends of society and ideology. The book focuses on their life and deeds from the late thirties until after the Second World War. Ricks does not eulogise either man, he recognises their flaws and earlier failures, yet puts them both in the historic perspective that they deserve.

Where Orwell helps us understand the threats to freedom, Churchill embodies true leadership; In the dark days of spring in 1940 he rallied a nation by telling people the truth, not what they wanted to hear. Today’s leaders have much to learn from both men.

“Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom” is a terrific read. It is well structured and flows easily without boring parts, it doesn’t dwell on the melodrama as some of the current films about Churchill do, but focuses on how these two flawed individuals helped shape our world.

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Emma Moreau - "The French Revolution"

Writing about modern democracy and its challenges, I realised that my knowledge of the French Revolution was somewhat limited and certainly cliched. This is a great summary of the events that led to the storming of the Bastille in 1789 and ended with the coup d’état by Napoleon. It dispassionately tells the story of the endless infighting, backstabbing and atrocities that engulfed the spirit of “liberte, egalite and fraternite”, mocking those fine sentiments into oblivion. The French Revolution did not just kill its children, but its fathers, too, in the end.

It is a concise and well written book, all the protagonists are clearly placed within what was essentially 10 years of utter chaos and terror.

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Peter Fitzsimmons - "Eureka: The Unfinished Revolution"

Peter Fitzsimmons managed not just to tell a compelling story about a fascinating and much misunderstood period of Australian history, but he does it in a way that captures the times impeccably – you can feel it, smell it, see it throughout a truly memorable readers journey. Loved it!

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Anthony Beevor - "The Second World War"

A totally engrossing and captivating book that manages to compress so much knowledge and details into an immensely accomplished story. The heroes, the villains and the utter folly of war told with passion and respect, yet managing to convey it in a way that also presents the big picture. Lest we forget, Beevor is the ultimate war historian.

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Conn Igggulden - "Wars of the Roses: Stormbird (Book 1)"

Conn Igggulden is a master. Well researched, poetic license taken only when required and only to ensure the story is told with intensity, flair and suspense. The characters are believable and the plots plausible. The various scenes are described in enough detail so you can see it, smell it and feel it. Men described at their worst and sometimes at their best, in the context of a time where life was cheap, living precarious and death horrible. Cannot wait for the next installment.

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Rob Mundle - "Great South Land"

A great read (or I should say listen, as I did on Audible), Rob Mundle has a talent for narrating historical facts in a way that makes it interesting and enjoyable. I learnt a lot from this book, great insights into a fascinating period of maritime exploration and its motivations. Intriguing stories of how coincidence, greed, bravery and quite literally escapism shaped the time leading up to the discovery of Terra Australis. Our history could have been quite different with just another tack here, a wind change there….

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